Friday, January 28, 2005

"Julius Caesar" quotes

Quotes from The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare...

Excerpt from Mark Antony’s speech:

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest
(For Brutus is an honorable man,
So are they all, all honorable men),
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me;
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill;
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept;
Ambition should have been made of sterner stuff.
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And sure he is an honorable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause;
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason! Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it comes back to me.
But yesterday the word of Caesar might
Have stood against the world; now lies he there,
And none so poor to do him reverence.
O masters! If I were disposed to stir
Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong and Cassius wrong,
Who, you all know, are honorable men.
I will not do them wrong; I rather choose
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,
Than I will wrong such honorable men.”
-Act III, scene ii

Other quotes:
“For the eye sees not itself but by reflection, by some other things.”
-Brutus, Act I, scene ii
“Men at some times are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.”
-Cassius, Act I, scene ii
“Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber. Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies which busy care draws in the brains of men; therefore thou sleep’st so sound.”
-Brutus, Act II, scene i
“By all your vows of love, and that great vow which did incorporate and make us one, that you unfold to me, your self, your half, why you are heavy…”
-Portia, Act II, scene i
“Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have head, it seems to me most strange that men should fear, seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come.”
-Caesar, Act II, scene ii
“I trouble thee too much, but thou art willing. [It is my duty, sir.] I should not urge thy duty past thy might; I know young bloods look for a time of rest.”
-Brutus, Act IV, scene iii
“This was the noblest Roman of them all…His life was gentle, and the elements so mixed in him that Nature might stand up and say to all the world, “This was a man!””-Antony, Act V, scene v

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